You are currently browsing the monthly archive for November 2011.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer wrote…

If the Church refuses to face the stern reality of sin, it will gain no credence when it talks of forgiveness. Such a Church sins against its sacred trust and walks unworthily of the gospel. It is an unholy Church, squandering the precious treasure of the Lord’s forgiveness.

(The Cost of Discipleship, 288)

Advertisements

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was in New York City in 1930. Germany was a different nation when he returned. Eberhard Bethge put it this way…

He now began to teach on a faculty whose theology he did not share, and to preach in a church whose self-confidence he regarded as unfounded. More aware than before, he now became part of society that was moving toward political, social and economic chaos.

(Ferdinand SchlingensiepenDietrich Bonhoeffer 1906-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance, 78).

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was in New York City in 1930. There has been debate over the years that he first experienced genuine faith in Christ there. Did he become an evangelical? Did his faith deepen during his time there?

Hans Pfeifer, a German scholar who had made an in-depth study on ‘Bonhoeffer’s study year at Union Theological Seminary in 1930/31 enabled him to find his own way to learn faith, leaving behind everything that might be in the way, however precious and impressive it might be.’ He refers here to Bonhoeffer’s strong ties with his family and goes on:

It is not far-fetched to say that, for Bonhoeffer’s theology, discipleship began to become the centre of Christian life right then and there, when he befriended Jean Lasserre and matured as a member of a small group of similarly minded friends. By their mutual encouragement, this friendship paved the way to find life directly in the Gospel. He learned that as an individual, all by himself, he could never be strong enough to go this way. Sanctorum communio (the fellowship of saints) was not only a theological concept but had of necessity to become a real social community of disciples.

(Ferdinand SchlingensiepenDietrich Bonhoeffer 1906-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance, 75).

The Steelers are playing the Chiefs in Kansas City today. My son, Jon and I are going with another father son, Jim and Brandon. I have been a Steelers fan for decades. I get to see them play live for the first time tonight at 7:20 PM. I am pretty excited!

When Dietrich Bonhoeffer was in New York City in 1930, he was able to refine his ability to speak in English. This would benefit him…

Reinhold Seeburg…wrote to Bonhoeffer to congratulate him on having learned English, and confessed that in recent years he himself had hardly felt any gap in his education as keenly as the inability to speak ‘with tongues of angels’…Indeed the languages that Bonhoeffer had learned put him ahead of most Germans in theological fields at the time.

(Ferdinand SchlingensiepenDietrich Bonhoeffer 1906-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance, 74).

Dietrich Bonhoeffer wrote…

The community of the saints is not an “ideal” community consisting of perfect and sinless men and women, where there is no need of further repentance. No, it is a community which proves that it is worthy of the gospel of forgiveness by constantly and sincerely proclaiming God’s forgiveness…It is a community of men and women who have genuinely encountered the precious grace of God, and whom walk worthily of the gospel by not casting that grace recklessly away.

(The Cost of Discipleship, 287)

Happy Thanksgiving!

“…give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus” (1 Thessalonians 5:18)

When Dietrich Bonhoeffer was in New York City in 1930, he formed friendships with four people: Paul Lehmann, Frank Fisher, Erwin Sutz and Jean Lasserre. Regarding Jean Lasserre…

The Frenchman Jean Lasserre was the first Christian minister with pacifist tendencies Bonhoeffer had met, and was the one who got him to read the peace commandment in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5) as the commandment of Jesus to his disciples that they must follow until Judgement Day.

The passionate appeals for peace for which Bonhoeffer became known a few years later in the ecumenical movement had their origins in conversations in America with Jean Lasserre. Even when, speaking in American churches, Bonhoefffer was emphasizing that there was a peace movement in Germany, Lasserre’s influence could already be felt…

…That he got along especially well with French conversation partners, with whom reconciliation was considered impossible because of their attitude toward Germany, was certainly not least of all the result of the generous amounts of time which he and Jean Lasserre had devoted to one another.

(Ferdinand SchlingensiepenDietrich Bonhoeffer 1906-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance, 70-71).

When Dietrich Bonhoeffer was in New York City in 1930, he formed friendships with four people: Paul Lehmann, Frank Fisher, Erwin Sutz and Jean Lasserre. Regarding Erwin Sutz…

After his return from the USA Erwin Sutz remained an important theological conversation partner. That they had to carry on their dialogue in written form, and that the letters still exist, gives us deep insights into Bonhoeffer’s personal and theological development. From 1938 on Sutz became the link between Bonhoeffer and his twin sister Sabine, who had to flee with her family to England. Since Sutz was in Switzerland; a neutral country, they send important family news back and forth through him.

(Ferdinand SchlingensiepenDietrich Bonhoeffer 1906-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance, 70)

When Dietrich Bonhoeffer was in New York City in 1930, he formed friendships with four people: Paul Lehmann, Frank Fisher, Erwin Sutz and Jean Lasserre. Regarding Frank Fischer…

Through Frank Fischer, Bonhoeffer first learned to see the world ‘from below, from the perspective of the outcasts, the suspects, the maltreated, the powerless, the oppressed and reviled, in short from the perspective of the suffering.’ He wrote this on New Year’s Eve, 1943, in his essay ‘After Ten Years’, and described it as ‘en experience of incomparable value’. This practice even before the Hitler era, in seeing the world from the underside was one of the learning experiences that made him a man for the Resistance

(Ferdinand SchlingensiepenDietrich Bonhoeffer 1906-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance, 70)

November 2011
S M T W T F S
« Oct   Dec »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Twitter Updates

Error: Please make sure the Twitter account is public.