Congressman Trey Gowdy at 65,000-Member Megachurch: Don’t Expect Political, Social ‘Messiah’; Answers to All Political Questions in Bible

BY WALLACE HENLEY , SPECIAL TO CP
July 1, 2014|2:53 pm

HOUSTON – Don’t expect a political messiah to arise in the contemporary cultural situation, said the U.S. Congressman who is chairing the select committee to investigate the death of a U.S. envoy in Benghazi, Libya in September 2012.

Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-South Carolina, told campuses at Houston’s 65,000-member Second Baptist Church June 28-29 that people who are hoping for an Abraham Lincoln or Ronald Reagan in the political sphere or a Martin Luther King in the social arena will be disappointed. Today’s media, political, and cultural atmosphere focuses on tearing down people who seek leadership.

While there may not be hope arising from the political and social streams, authentic hope is in Christ, and that’s what Christians should communicate, said Gowdy. “If you want to change culture, don’t wait on the Supreme Court or anyone else,” said the South Carolina congressman. The real hope in Christ is expressed through the lives of His followers.

“Changing the hearts and minds in this country is our job,” Gowdy said. But Christians should push for change with a different style than that characterizing the present political environment. “You don’t insult people into changing their minds,” said Gowdy, a former prosecuting attorney.
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Gowdy and Ben Young, son of Second Baptist pastor Ed Young, were close friends at Baylor University in the early 1980s. Ed Young, who has known Gowdy for decades, noted in a prayer that the South Carolina Congressman “is serving at a strategic time in history.”

“What is the role of the believer in the current environment?” Gowdy pointed to the example of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a German pastor-theologian martyred for his opposition to Hitler and the Nazis. “Bonhoeffer could not watch persons of another religion be exterminated,” he said. “And that’s why he was executed.”

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