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“Sin demands to have a man by himself. The more isolated a person is, the more destructive will be the power of sin over him.”

~Dietrich Bonhoeffer

“If I sit next to a madman as he drives a car into a group of innocent bystanders, I can’t, as a Christian, simply wait for the catastrophe, then comfort the wounded and bury the dead. I must try to wrestle the steering wheel out of the hands of the driver.”

“ACTION SPRINGS NOT FROM THOUGHT, BUT FROM A READINESS FOR RESPONSIBILITY.”

Mission & Values

Men of Bonhoeffer strive to persevere in righteousness, grow in integrity, live and die with conviction and serve with courage, steadfastly upholding a Christ-like community dedicated to these ideals.

The House of Bonhoeffer is about excellence and community. Throughout the past ten years, men of Bonhoeffer have risen to prominence as men of achievement; founding clubs, leading the school, and serving throughout New York. But the individuals of Bonhoeffer are not merely known for their achievements. The men of Bonhoeffer remain outstanding individuals, marked by their pursuance of life together.

The House of Bonhoeffer is a community where individuals of integrity can pursue life together; a community which strives to emulate the devotion to God seen in Dietrich Bonhoeffer; a community comprised of excellent writers, entrepreneurs, future statesmen, journalists, philosophers, filmmakers, policy analysts, philanthropists, and more.

“This community of men who seek God and lives of integrity means a lot to me, and I’m proud to call myself a man of Bonhoeffer.” John Sailer, ‘15

“I love the House on Bonhoeffer, because of the men who gave me greater perspective. Coming to NYC, I had very few answers for my future and was in need of wisdom of those who went before me. In my house, the upperclassmen took the time to show me how to succeed in school, gave me opportunities in work, and mentored me on how to be a more confident leader. For this, I love the House of Bonhoeffer.” James Bentson, ‘16.

“The House of Bonhoeffer isn’t simply a group of college guys who have to deal with each other; we’re a tightly-knit group of men who strive to help each other out in all realms of life. Personally, I’ve learned to love myself for who I am because of the support that my Bonhoeffer brothers have given me. Just imagining going through my college experience without the support and love of these men depresses and scares me.” Fermin Villalpando, ‘17.

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“We must be ready to allow ourselves to be interrupted by God.” 

~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Trump is far from a Hitler, but an interesting read anyway ~ Bryan

Americans today might do well to heed Bonhoeffer’s warning.

Although he was in power for only a handful of years, Hitler and his Nazi government slaughtered millions. One of the more well-known victims of that slaughter was Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who was executed on April 9th, 1945, a few short weeks before Hitler’s own death.

Unlike many of Hitler’s victims, Bonhoeffer was not a Jew, but a Lutheran minister, scholar, and theologian who boldly spoke against Hitler’s policies. Bonhoeffer landed a position in the German government during WWII and subsequently used that position as cover for assassination attempts against Hitler.

While awaiting execution, Bonhoeffer recorded a number of his thoughts in a work we now know as Letters and Papers from Prison. One of these essays, entitled On Stupidity, records some of the problems which Bonhoeffer likely saw at work in Hitler’s rise to power:

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“Those who love their dream of a Christian community more than they love the Christian community itself become destroyers of that Christian community even though their personal intentions may be ever so honest, earnest, and sacrificial.”

~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Apr. 13, 2017

 
Director of WWII-Set BONHOEFFER'S COST at Agape Theatre Blasts Sean Spicer for Holocaust RemarksJeff Davis, Director of Agape Theatre’s upcoming Texas Premiere of the WWII-set BONHOEFFER’S COST, blasted White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer for his recent remarks regarding Hitler and the Holocaust.On Tuesday, April 11th, when speaking on President Trump’s recent air strikes against Syria, Spicer said, “We didn’t use chemical weapons in World War II. You know, you had someone as despicable as Hitler who didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons.” When reminded that Hitler used gas chambers to execute millions, Spicer replied, “[Hitler] was not using the gas on his own people the way that Assad is doing,” before referring to Concentration Camps as “Holocaust Centers.”

In response to Spicer’s outlandish and false statements, Davis writes “It baffles, saddens, angers, and greatly concerns me-both as someone who identifies as half-Jewish and simply as a human being-that a key White House representative ignores the atrocities of the Holocaust and then, when reminded of history, downplays its significance and importance. […] But Spicer is a microcosm of a bigger issue. There are thousands of people worldwide who deny the Holocaust ever happened, as if 6 million people just mysteriously disappeared. There are millions more, particularly among the younger generations, who live in ignorance of the Holocaust because they’ve yet to hear about the horrors perpetrated during World War II. And I’d wager there are billions worldwide who are oblivious that a new Holocaust is currently happening in Chechnya as homosexuals are being sent to Concentration Camps. It’s for these reasons and more that Agape Theatre has chosen to tell the story of Bonhoeffer’s Cost. […] As the final Holocaust survivors die off, it becomes the responsibility of artists and storytellers to tell the stories of those who are no longer with us.”

You can read Mr. Davis‘s full response to Spicer’s statements here.

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April 10, 2017 by

Between my own blog, this one, and a couple others, I’ve written about 1,500 posts in the last six years. I try to do it well, with a less formal tone and much greater pace than typical academic writing but still reflecting a reasonably careful degree of prior research. But I’m afraid that my haste sometimes leads me to sloppiness — worse yet, sloppiness on topics where I’m writing outside of my fields of direct expertise and already at risk of stepping heedlessly into scholarly minefields.

As in the case of something I wrote over the weekend…

On Saturday I encouraged readers to seek out Come Before Winter, a new movie about the last days of the German pastor, theologian, and martyr Dietrich Bonhoeffer. I mentioned that it featured clips of an interview with Ferdinand Schlingensiepen, a German scholar whose 2006 biography of Bonhoeffer was published in English in 2010. At least among American readers, I noted, that work “was overshadowed by those written by Charles Marsh and Eric Metaxas….”

But then I went on (unnecessarily, I fear) to point out that Schlingensiepen has criticized both Metaxas and Marsh “for wrenching the German martyr out of his historical and theological context.” I quoted the following passage from Schlingensiepen’s dual review of Marsh’s Strange Glory and Metaxas’ Bonhoeffer:

Metaxas, BonhoefferMarsh and Metaxas have dragged Bonhoeffer into cultural and political disputes that belong in a U.S. context. The issues did not present themselves in the same way in Germany in Bonhoeffer’s time, and the way they are debated in Germany today differs greatly from that in the States. Metaxas has focused on the fight between right and left in the United States and has made Bonhoeffer into a likeable arch-conservative without theological insights and convictions of his own; Marsh concentrates on the conflict between the Conservatives and the gay rights’ movement. Both approaches are equally misguided and are used to make Bonhoeffer interesting and relevant to American society. Bonhoeffer does not need this and it certainly distorts the facts.

In retrospect, I think I did wrong to include this quotation — or, at least, to include it without adding any kind of critical comment. Here’s why:

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Dietrich Bonhoeffer was many things — poet, scholar, teacher, spy and more.

The German Lutheran pastor was hanged at Sachsenhausen concentration camp April 9, 1945. At just 39, he had published a considerable and diverse body of work.

Many have learned Bonhoeffer was a conspirator who plotted to kill Adolph Hitler in July 1944.

That’s untrue, according to “Bonhoeffer the Assassin? Challenging the Myth, Recovering His Call to Peacemaking,” by Mark Thiessen Nation, Anthony G. Siegrist and Daniel P. Umbel.

“There is not a shred of evidence that Bonhoeffer was linked in any way to … attempts on Hitler’s life,” they write.

It’s a persistent fiction nonetheless.

Bonhoeffer could have been fodder for Nazi propaganda: He was attractive, smart, hardworking, personable and came from an influential, well-known family. Instead, he believed the Aryan nationalism that swept through post World War I Germany was offensive.

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I think I know what DB means. As we are prayerfully intimate with Jesus, then his heart and will becomes ours.

When our will wholeheartedly enters into the prayer of Christ, then we pray correctly.”

Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1987-074-16, Dietrich Bonhoeffer.jpg

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